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20121031
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PBS
Oct 18, 2012 12:00am PDT
all my text books for free. it means i don't have to buy anything from a local provider. it means the education i'm getting isn't subject to the local nation. >> rose: and maybe you can educate yourself as a matter of fact you want to. >> i i was 14 before i could study a foreign language. i could choose spanish or french. i came from the richest nation on earth. now, imagine if you're four years old and have the choice of 100 languages and you don't have to ask your parents' permission, the mayor's permirkz the local religious leader's position, or the president of the country's permission. now you're endeathering and unleashing the power of humanity to an extent we are never seen. >> rose: some of the concliewgs of your book, the destruction of paper. , new kinds of cash, new kinds of transactions. what do you mean by that? >> i can create a key and put it on my phone and then i can use my phone to open a door. but that's the most basic thing that happens. as soon as the key becomes a piece of software, i can flip the key to 20 people. then i can create a key that only works if i'm
PBS
Oct 30, 2012 4:00pm PDT
a local businessman about -- businesswoman about the issues. >> how have the last four years been for you? >> it has been stressful. it has been a blessing, obviously. >> would you have liked more help as a small-business owner? gregg's absolutely. when the economy tanks, -- >> absolutely. ed, thingsconomy tanks got tight. i build this business. my plan was not helped by the economic situation. >> you are trying to encourage every business owner to employ just one extra person. >> jefferson county has an initiative, just add one. it is for stakeholders like myself, business owners, and we come together and say, let's put together a strategic plan to put people back to work. jefferson county has 20 douses bob businesses. our objective is that if we can get 5% of this area to hire one person, that is a lot of jobs. i think we have a certain group of folks that really understand how bad off we were when president obama took office. then we have the other based on emotion. and they have probably always voted for one party and probably always going to. i have no idea how this thing is
PBS
Oct 11, 2012 4:00pm PDT
am going to school. >> today is a lesson in the local language. in one fifth of afghan women can read or write, but that is a big improvement from a decade ago. the schools in remote areas are helping. there is a big turnout for the launch of this government school. 3 million afghan girls are getting some education. it still leaves 2 million that have never been the class. but attitudes are changing. >> hi bring the women of afghanistan up to the level, the owner of the future. and they are the owner of all that is happening. >> it is a new era for these girls. now learning to play cricket. they have had to stay at home if the taliban were still in power. curious about me and keen to talk, but outside, they face many restrictions and uncertainty about their future after nato forces pull out. this is one example of the progress has been getting a high school in the past 10 years, but in the rural and less secure areas, there are millions that are not getting any kind of education and are under pressure to get married while still a school age. it is tough being a girl in afghanistan, bu
PBS
Oct 30, 2012 7:00pm PDT
brought ashore, federal, state and local governments are already coordinating the cleanup. right now, thousands of workers from every level of government are on a rescue mission in new jersey and new york's hardest- hit areas. fema is pulling in generators and working with power companies to get the lights back on. the storm's damage was so severe that president obama quickly declared major disasters in new york and new jersey overnight. the decision frees up federal dollars to help families and businesses recover their losses. it also allows the u.s. to reimburse local and state governments for some of the expenses they'll face as they rebuild. the east coast may be cleaning up, but sandy isn't finished. the storm is plowing inland, dumping snow across the appalachians. with sandy still churning, it's nearly impossible to know how extensive the damage will be or how long the cleanup will last. sylvia hall, nbr, washington. >> tom: earlier, susie mentioned the challenges of getting around one of the world's largest and most congested cities with no public transportation. city buses b
PBS
Oct 31, 2012 3:00pm PDT
you is that the federal government will be working as closely as possible with the state and local officials and we will not quit until this is done. and the directive i have given-- and i said this yesterday but i will repeat and i think craig and others who are working with me right now know i mean it-- we are not going to tolerate red tape, we're not going to tolerate bureaucracy. >> woodruff: meanwhile, republican mitt romney returned to the campaign trail today with three events in florida. the g.o.p. presidential nominee also mentioned the ongoing recovery in the northeast. >> this is... this is quite a time for the country, as you know. we're... we're going through trauma in a major part of the country, a kind of trauma you've experienced here in florida more than once. and... and it's interesting to see how people come togetr in a circumstance like this. we've seen folks from all over the country step forward and... and offer contributions. >> woodruff: bumps in the recovery were evident in new york city late today, where the public, bellevue hospital , started evacuating a
PBS
Oct 5, 2012 7:30pm PDT
, they are less likely to vote -- not only taxes, but there are over 100 local bond issues in california this year and dozens of local tax measures. if they feel like they are getting squeezed economically, i think they'll be less inclined to vote for taxes at the state level and at the local level and bonds. and i think that's where it could come out and bite. >> dan, i want to ask you this. what about the demeanor of the man? is he thinking about the potential of losing this? he must be thinking about that and what's that doing to his demeanor and his whole attitude to this thing? he's going to prop 30. is he prepared to not win it? >> i suppose he is. he says he is. he says he's -- he'll follow the will of the people. i think the jerry brown that's here now is different in many ways than the jerry brown i saw 30, 35 years ago when we were both much younger. he is much more -- i don't think he's changed inside very much. but i think his demeanor has changed and i think he's much more cautious, less willing to go out on a limb, very kind of, almost risk averse in many respect
PBS
Oct 30, 2012 10:00pm PDT
to the local hospital. >> ryssdal: conservative political causes have been in his blood for a long time. bopp got his start with the right-to-life movement in the 1970s. and he says he quickly learned an important lesson-- campaign finance laws were keeping conservative groups from getting their message out. >> so, to defend them and to make sure that they can be effective means opposing those laws. >> ryssdal: over the past 30 years, jim bopp has challenged more than 150 campaign finance laws. he's won some of the biggest cases in the country. >> campaign finance laws don't do anything for citizens, other than stifle and limit them. the average voter could care less who's, quote, "funding" a politician or... >> ryssdal: really? >> ...or a... of course. >> ryssdal: do you think people should care about where this money's coming from? >> generally no, because it's the message. you know, you either buy the argument or don't buy the argument. generally no, it doesn't matter. truth doesn't change because of who's funding it. john gregg is either pro-life or not. what difference does it
PBS
Oct 28, 2012 4:00pm PDT
schools received the largest share of their dollars from local property tax revenues. after proposition 13 passed, local property tax revenues in the state fell by over 50%. >> in response, voters passed prop 98 in 1988, which guaranteed a minimum funding level for k through 12 education. today, schools get more than half their revenue from the state, with the rest coming from the federal government, property taxes and fees and other local revenue. but it hasn't completely worked, according to the california budget project's jonathan caplan. >> because the state provides a large portion of its budget to schools, when the state experiences revenue shortfalls, when the state goes through a budget crisis as we've been experiencing, what that means is that schools are going to be in the cross hairs. >> the result? schools that once were tops in the nation are no longer. >> california ranks dead last when it comes to the number of students per teacher. it also ranks dead last when it comes to the number of students per counselor. >> one national study now ranks california schools
PBS
Oct 24, 2012 4:00pm PDT
will begin midnight local time 13 days to go until the u.s. chooses the next president. each side is trying to get an all-important women's vote. what is driving their decision? steve kingston went to denver, colorado to find out. >> the breathtaking fall splendor of the rocky mountains. in his foothills sit the mile high city. the beating heart of a critical swing states, a state where women voters outnumber men by more than 100,000. >> my name is rebecca. i am a single mother with three teenage children. >> i am catherine. my husband is working two jobs while i stay home and take care of my 2-year-old daughter, charlotte. >> women on a budget come to this giant retailer for a no- frills convenience. the cards are used to have a corporate job. the right after she was born i was laid off we went from having a lot of money to not nearly as much money. >> bill clinton famous huizar -- famously targets of bombs. sarah palin rallied hockey mom spirit of the 2012 variation on that group could decide the outcome. that is because in elections wal-mart moms intend to make up their minds late
PBS
Oct 4, 2012 4:00pm PDT
break that advantage by senate the refinery in malaysia. but a group of activists and local residents are against that move. we have this report from malaysia. kayaker from rainforest to refineries, but at what cost? too high, shop these activists. they are fighting plans to open an australian refinery for rare earth minerals pit nearby. gendarme the court is still blocking the project. the government says it has been thoroughly scrutinized and will be stay. hobbies as 17 elements are found in many places. p.j. get these 17 elements are found in many places but all are only refight in china, a messy, polluted prospect. the australian company line s hopes this, largest growers plant outside china will break that monopoly. -- largest rare earth plant outside china. could need up to one-third of a man outside china these essential minerals. the company says it has passed every test every environmental question put to it and it is making the case for two years, yet it has gained very little traction with a local population that simply does not trust the country or malaysian authorities ar
PBS
Oct 10, 2012 3:00pm PDT
volunteer lisa cillessen, a local teacher. lisa and her husband jeremiah, the parents of three children, say they are even more pro-obama than four years ago. >> what changed for me was when i actually started working on the campaign and really, really started digging into some of the things that have been accomplished in the past four years. this is still the right leader for our country and we still need to keep moving this direction. >> ifill: jeremiah is a classic jeffco voter-- a registered republican who is crossing party lines to support mr. obama. but he also believes the president fell short in last week's debate. >> i think he really has to lock in on the undecided voters and that's first going to be one, particularly in this county. and i think there is an overwhelming number who after the first debate shifted a little bit. they're looking for somebody they can trust and somebody they can believe in. and in the first debate romney appeared to be that candidate. >> we have to get to these doors. this is the difference between winning and losing. >> ifill: both campaigns are steppin
PBS
Oct 9, 2012 4:00pm PDT
complications in hospital. she was just 51 and used to sell sweets on the steps of a local church. poor families like this one made an impression on the mayor back in 2005. >> i was running for mayor, and one day, i encountered a little kid crying in front of his door of his house. and i went to him and asked him, "what happened?" "my mother left me." i asked the neighbor what was going on. he told me is that she took her television set to a pawn shop in order to get some money to put his father to rest and get the coffin, get the things. and then, i said, "this is something that is happening every day in the capital. we have to do something about it." and that day, i started promoting that if i became mayor, we would have funeral homes in order to give dignity to the poorest people of the city. [indistinct talking] >> and in a culture where community ties are strong, that may mean taking everything needed for a wake into one of the poor barrios of tegucigalpa. with an empty coffin on board, the pickup heads off to the morgue to collect the body of a young gunshot victim. we joined them
PBS
Oct 4, 2012 7:00pm PDT
, you're looking to source locally, correct? >> correct. >> reporter: how difficult is it to do that? it sounds very expensive. >> you have to look at the etymology, the beginning of trends, and when the consumer starts to change-- and all of the pressure is on locally grown. they don't want as many preservatives, they don't want chemicals, they don't want things of this nature, the marketplace will follow. funny thing about the marketplace-- it follows consumers, and we believe we are. >> reporter: you have rolled out in costco in california. will you be rolling your food out at all costco stores? >> that is the plan. can i announce something to you? we have not announced it directly, but we are now national in retail. you can now go on lyfe kitchen, "lyfe"-- "love your food everyday"-- and go on amazon.com and get your food delivered to your house. >> reporter: what did you learn at mcdonald's that you are applying to this business? >> we learned a little bit about taste. you know, it's got to taste good, number one. number two, we learned you got to serve a lot of people quickly.
PBS
Oct 30, 2012 6:00pm PDT
winds, and so it is very important for the public to continue to monitor the situation in your local community, listen to state and local officials. >> woodruff: the warning included especially pennsylvania where the rain kept falling and flood waters kept rising today. and where the storm already passed, clean-up was the order of the day with first light utility crews from across the country began working to restore power to millions of people. >> we're really lucky to have, you know, everybody safe and have the crews already here getting us fixed up. >> woodruff: in parts of appalachia, the problem was snow. the hurricane dumped up to a foot of it after merging with a cold front catching some people off guard. >> i wasn't ready for it either. woodruff: meanwhile in the midwest, the storm's power stretched all the way to chicago as waves crashed along the shores of lake michigan. the windy city also got gusts up to 60 miles an hour especially challenging for cyclists like this one. >> it's really tough going north. it's very usey going south. you don't even have to pedal. >> woodruf
PBS
Oct 2, 2012 4:00pm PDT
material. >> some of these were passed by a local delegation. you go to the local primaries and we go to the national convention. it is the buttons, the posters, the signs, the funny hats people wear. what we are trying to do is to collect the entire of sent through these material options. bring this back to washington, there is a cataloging process which will ultimately lead to a digitized record. >> we exist to document culture and this is part of that. it is that materiality that we are trying to gather. it has to have dimension to it. >> i feel that is important to understand history in order to understand the president. history does have a way of repeating itself and in america, it repeats itself every four years. if you have an understanding of tricks, techniques that have been used, you can understand what is going on now. >> that brings today's show to a close. for all of us here at world news america, thank you for watching and come back tomorrow. >> make sense of international news at bbc.com/news. >> funding for this presentation was made possible by the freeman foundation of
PBS
Oct 10, 2012 7:00pm PDT
of a new local daily deals service. >> it would seem to be a natural for ebay to the extent that they do have such a substantial user base. >> reporter: ebay has come a long way since its first sale of a broken laser pointer back in 1995. but if you still think of ebay as primarily an auction site selling second-hand junk, you're wrong. >> one sentence after the majority of the business are things that are new. they are sold at fixed price. ebay is an end to end digital commerce power house. not a flea market auction site. >> reporter: ebay now boasts 25 million sellers and four times as many buyers. over $75 billion in commerce is done on the site a year. the new look comes at a key time: >> we really think ebay is a go- to destination for holiday shopping. they can find not only the things they know they want. but a lot of things they probably didn't think they might of wanted. >> reporter: and ebay is not necessarily talking about handbags and electronics. >> ebay sells about 10,000 automobiles a week on a mobile phone. >> reporter: which proves just about anything can be boug
PBS
Oct 18, 2012 7:00pm PDT
manufacturer is pairing with a local college, developing its next generation of workers. >> susie: that and more tonight on nbr! >> tom: it wasn't supposed to be like this for google. falling advertising prices, disappointing profits, and a mistimed earnings release. the internet's go-to search engine surprised the market this afternoon when it reported its third quarter results. they weren't expected until after the closing bell, but instead they were released-- without authorization, according to google-- by the company's financial printing company. it wasn't a pleasant surprise. google earned $9.03 per share, down from a year ago and $1.62 below estimates. yes, google's search engine continues to see more use, but the prices google charges for its core search advertisement product fell. the number of times visitors clicked on search ads was up 33%, but the prices advertisers paid for those clicks was down 15%. >> the inventory how it goes the more clicks there are going to be, the lower it will cost people at the end of the day. >> then there's google's newest division >> tom: then there
PBS
Oct 5, 2012 4:00pm PDT
, supported by the local community, have been demanding a wage increase. the illegal strikes continue. today, one person was killed, but it is not clear why and by whom. it seems the shooting of 34-5 -- since the shooting of 34 miners, the security forces have maintain heavy forces. consequently, there's still a deep sense of mistrust between the strikers who continue to carry their traditional weapons and the police. in some instances, the tension escalates to near breaking point. the police are determined not to have a repeat of what happened. they disarmed the minors whenever an opportunity presents itself. they say the strike has cost them 39 ounces of platinum in production. south africans are hoping that these strikes will come to an end soon. the country is desperately in need of the nelson mandela magic of peace and reconciliation. >> as we have been reporting, the u.s. unemployment rate has fallen below 8% for the first time in almost four years. it is an encouraging sign, especially for middle-class families struggling to make ends meet. but even those who have jobs can still find
PBS
Oct 25, 2012 1:00am PDT
year ago, as state and local governments tighten their belts. the construction industry is hoping next year will be better for hiring than this one. many u.s. businesses have put projects on hold, due to political uncertainty, and worries about the fiscal cliff. but the most important factor is the economy: >> you might expect that as the housing recovery gets a little bit of pace over the next year or so, that should translate into stronger hiring going forward. we are not going to return to levels we were at before the recession, the housing sector is not going to be that big again. but the trend should be up. >> reporter: if construction improves, it's good for the economy as a whole. according to trade association figures, every billion dollars spent on construction creates 28,000 jobs throughout the economy. erika miller, "n.b.r.," new york. >> susie: tomorrow, we tackle the rental market, and one especially hot market for renters, as we continue our week-long look at the housing comeback. >> tom: from housing to manufacturing. manufacturing has been a bright spot in the u.s. econ
PBS
Oct 18, 2012 4:00pm PDT
come to -- come at a cost. the water is tainted, a disgusting cocktail locals say is too politic to use. >> all along the river, abandoned factories. the polluted water from those places release mouse. >> china's next generation are about to take power here. they face two problems. how to keep the economy growing and also tackle rising discontent and the damage that has been done to the environment. a few weeks ago, a right police battled crowds. -- riot police battled crowds. there were furious about plans for a cooper factory -- copper factory. the billion-pound project would have brought many jobs, but it was not wanted. >> of course, health is more important than jobs. it matters for our children. if we are sick, how can we keep supporting them? >> china's next leaders are inheriting a toxic legacy. they have plans for cleaner gross, but that will be slow and expensive. -- clean air growth, but that will be slow and expensive. the waste stains the ground yellow. chinese call these places cancer villages. there are dozens of them were cancer rates have soared for reasons not cleared.
PBS
Oct 2, 2012 3:00pm PDT
jobs. >> brown: that message is a rallying cry to mike armstrong of rocky mount. now he hosts a local tv show on politics. he helped start a tea party branch here in 2010. what are the biggest issues? >> jobs, jobs and jobs. that would be your top three >> brown: that's it. so it's a question of who can do the better scrob >> who can do the better job not creating jobs. we realize politicians don't create job but at least enhancing the environment that can create jobs. >> brown: do you think there's much enthusiasm? >> as a conservative i am much more enthusiastic about mitt romney than i was john mccain. i thought john mccain was just an extension of george bush. we had had enough of that. >> brown: but polls show enthusiasm remains a question mark here for mitt romney and for the president. he also has to worry about criticism from his left. people like duke economics professor william garretty who cites the almost one in five blacks out of work here and says the president simply hasn't done enough to help. >> that's pretty staggering actually. i mean, we're approaching the kinds of
PBS
Oct 31, 2012 2:30pm PDT
state and local level? >> hispanics are not monolithic, and when you look at florida, you have a cuban-american community that has historically been very republican. i think people are interested and want to report hispanic candidates, they are good. if marco rubio had had a pro in negation reform position, he would be the candidate, but since he does not, he was not chosen. eventually, i think the more sober voices will have more weight. tavis: what you think is the future of marco rubio? he did not win the hispanic vote. what is your read on his future? >> he is an intelligent man. he is quite articulate. does he play in florida? i am not sure. does he play in taxes, i am not sure. marco rubio is seen in some ways of being the latino face of a party that is very harsh to latinos. >> the democratic mayor acquitted himself quite nicely. what is his future? >> he is probably the biggest star they have the right now. he is a very smart guy. he is highly educated and very different from a lot of other latino politicians. he is completely american in his point of view. i think it wil
PBS
Oct 6, 2012 12:00am PDT
locally or globally. >> rose: joseph stiglitz and chelsea clinton when we continue. funding for charlie rose was provided by the followingal additional funding provided by these funders: and by bloomberg captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: the debate over the widening economic divide there this country has intensified it helped spark the occupy wall street movement one year ago and has also been a key issue the presidential campaign as the economy continues to falter. >> this country doesn't succeed when only the rich get richer. we succeed when the middle class gets bigger. >> rose: joseph stiglitz is a nobel prize winning economist. in his new book the price of inequality, how today's divided society endangers our future. he argues that a wealthy minority in this country has fed a vicious circle of growing inequality. i'm pleased to have joe stiglitz back at this table. welcome. >> nice to be here. >> rose: where do you think the american economy is today? and is it trending upwards? >> it's not really trending
PBS
Oct 9, 2012 6:00pm PDT
was released yesterday on a local radio station. the judge dismissed that as an unbelievable conspiracy theory. and he talked about the damage that this case has done to the... to individuals, the loss of innocence and to a loss of community. and that those factored into his thinking in crafting the sentence that he imposed. >> woodruff: and as he was saying this, what was sandusky doing? >> sandusky during... i mean, he was watching whoever was speaking. when the prosecutor was talking, he was sort of... i mean, i guess he was... it would be fairly described as a smirk. but when the young men were speaking, he was more of a smile. i mean, he was engaged but at one point when his own lawyer was talking he was chewing his fingernails. but besides that, i wouldn't say that he was, you know, giving a lot of emotion. there wasn't a lot to read there in terms of body language. >> woodruff: i read that the judge said that, as he was crafting the sentence, he kept in mind one of the victims in the shower who was seen by a janitor. do we know any more about that? >> yeah. that victim
PBS
Oct 23, 2012 6:00pm PDT
its large military population, is focused on how the cuts would affect the local economy. our story comes from cathy lewis of whro in hampton roads and is part of our new collaboration with public media partners across the country. we're bringing you reports from areas that will likely dictate the outcome of the election in a series we call btleground dispatches. >> are you aware of the term sequestration? >> no. are you familiar with the terminology sequestration? >> say again. reporter: people here in the hampton roads region might not be able to define sequestration but with the largest military concentration in the country they know big cuts to defense means the loss of lots of jobs. >> you've lost a lot of work. you're going to put a lot of people out of work. most people work with navy vessels. if you cut the government spending you're cutting jobs. that's going to trickle on down to where the people aren't working, they're not spending the money out in the economy. >> reporter: 6% of the population here wears a military uniform. another 40% work in businesses that support the
PBS
Oct 25, 2012 3:00pm PDT
benefits or state and local government grants or contracts. if we don't restrain spending someone is going to get less money from the federal government. >> reporter: so if not health care, how about something else? and i can guess why you wanted us to go here. that's the pentagon and this must be military spending which is how much of the total budget? >> it's about 20% of the federal budget now. $700 billion last year. more than the combined defense budget of the next 17 largest defense budgets. more than china plus russia plus germany plus france plus spain plus israel plus the united arab emirates and a few more i can't remember. >> reporter: do we really cant to skimp on defense with china an emerging superpower making offensive moves in the south china sea and those islands in japan? >> we want to have enough defense to protect ourselves but the question is how much defense do we really need and how much can we afford to be the cops of the world? the thing that strikes me about the defense budget is how large the component decisions are so take this one question. how many aircr
PBS
Oct 26, 2012 6:00pm PDT
look at how gains in the local economy offer both campaigns a chance to trumpet their policies. his story is part of our new collaboration with public media partners across the country as we bring you reports from areas that will likely determine the outcome of the election in a series we call "battleground dispatches." >> that's the sound of the economy here in northeast ohio being reborn. at this brand-new manufacturing plant in hubbard, emmitt's oil & gas, construction is booming. >> we've doubled our in-house staff. we have over a hundred people working in our building, that is engineering, project managers, drafters, superintendents, even office help. >> reporter: chris, the company's chief operating officer grew newspaper northeast ohio which suffered through decades of economic decline. today he's ace business thrive on a resurgence in energy and auto manufacturing, he's feeling optimistic. >> there's a lot more smiling, a lot more sunshine around here, and we're all enjoying that. >> reporter: it's a far cry from the economic freefall ohio endured years before the recession
PBS
Oct 18, 2012 3:00pm PDT
with local leaders? >> the maddening thing about these files is that we don't know ultimately. there are ott a lot of them that were destroyed by the scouts in 1975. more of them would go away when scouts turned 75 or died. so for us, the issue is we found individual cases where it happened and we probably found 15 or 20 different cases. then we also take into account that local scout masters are also local officials. so by that measure it's countless. >> sreenivasan: let's talk about that. how do we calculate the number of people affected? you have a finite number of individuals, allegedly perpetrators of this. but what about the victims? >> the tabulation of the victims hasn't been done and part of the issue now is their names have been redactd from the files. so anyone looking to go back and tabulate that is going to have the problem that they won't have different names of victims so you don't know exsfrept the context if it's one person or five people or ten people. so it's impossible to tell at this point how many victims we have. >> sreenivasan: so you've had several decades of
PBS
Oct 3, 2012 6:00pm PDT
local bank. and she ended up living alone by choice and the reason she could be independent was because of social security and medicare. she had worked all her life, put in this money, and understood that there was a basic guarantee, a floor under which she could not go. and that's the perspective i bring when i think about what's called entitlements. you know, the name itself implies some sense of dependency on the part of these folks. these are folks who have worked hard. like my grandmother. and there are millions of people out there who are counting on this. so my approach is to say how do we strengthen the system over the long term? and in medicare, what we did was we said we are going to have to bring down the costs if we're going to deal with our long-term deficits, but to do that, let's look where some of the money is going. $716 billion we were able to save from the medicare program by no longer over-paying insurance companies, by making sure that we weren't over-paying providers, and using that money we were actually able to lower prescription drug costs for seniors by
PBS
Oct 10, 2012 3:00am PDT
as one people... >> there's a long article about the race in tchicago reader, the local alternative paper in chicago, where one of obama's opponents, he says, "obama is viewed as the white man in blackface in our community." >> it got bad. it was real bad. a number of black nationalists in the african-american community, you know, made all sorts of allegations about barack being a tool of, you know, hyde park and the university of chicago, which are both code words for both whites and jews. >> narrator: bobby rush's strategy worked. on election day, the voters embraced the incumbent. obama knew what was going to happen. >> in the end, voters decided to stick with bobby rush by a huge, huge, huge margin. so it was a very bruising loss for him. >> narrator: obama lost by 30 points. >> it was the first time in his life where people didn't just really accept him immediately, where things didn't really go perfectly for him. >> narrator: the loss seemed like it might be the end of obama's political career. >> people who saw him afterward say he was as low as they've ever seen him. one per
PBS
Oct 16, 2012 4:00pm PDT
. >> they protected cuba opposing revolution. it was a high-risk strategy. near the launch site, locals recollect the days. >> if something had gone wrong, it was all over. these were two huge powers are to the teeth. it was serious. >> no more so when a u.s. plane was shot down near cuba. two years -- two days later it was removed. in return, president kennedy pledged not to invade cuba. >> we emerged stronger. we had won another battle. the americans did not invade. we are just a little island. if they are the most powerful country in the world, but we are still here. >> but it could so easily have ended otherwise. bbc news, havana. >> you can follow all the actions at the second presidential date on our web site. from all this year, thank you for watching. >> funding was made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu. at union brink, -- at union bank, our finance a manager's guide you. we put our extended global network to work for a wide range of companies from small businesses to major corporations. what can we do for you? by kcet los angeles. - h
PBS
Oct 19, 2012 7:30pm PDT
2004 combined. on the presidential level, we're talking about 2 or 3 billion spent for a local election, magnitudes increase over previous years. >> give us the roots. >> a lot comes from outside groups. our new campaign finance system encourages groups to spend money despite the campaigns. american crossroads is an organization started by car carl rove which allows them to runny tv commercials they want, but they also have a group gps, a non-profit dedicated to social welfare, which means they don't even have to disclose where the money comes from. half a billion right now is just from organizations. >> part of the organization of finance reform was to prevent corruption and increase transparency. >> what's going on? >> there is americans for responsible leadership which poured money into the state campaign. their transparency is government, but when they put $11 million in the campaign ad, they don't disclose where they get their money from. what we do is say if you give money to a candidate, you might be corrupting them. we need to cap that. in san francisco, give a $500 contribution
PBS
Oct 17, 2012 4:00pm PDT
tuesday. tensions are high between the u.s. military and the locals campaigning for american bases to be removed from the island. lance armstrong was once regarded as a miracle man. not only did he win a record- breaking seven titles, he overcame cancer. the week after damning allegations were published against them, he was stripped of his car sponsorship deal with nike. he has announced that he is stepping down as chairman of his cancer charity. >> accused of being edgy, a starstruck career in danger of disintegrating. the scandal engulfing the champion gets bigger. his long-standing sponsored doesn't want to be associated with lance armstrong anymore. more than 1000 pages by the u.s. anti-doping agency, too strong to be ignored. despite constant in the aisles of wrongdoing. the announcement was made within minutes of another stunning revelation. he stepped down as chairman of the cancer charity he founded. live strong has raised hundreds of millions of dollars fighting the disease with them as its figurehead. in his first public statement since the release of the report, he said he
PBS
Oct 20, 2012 12:00am PDT
. >> well, the germ of the idea was a council election, a local council election that would be subverted by teenagers. which was a device to expose certain secrets, yeah, that was the basic idea. and i was excited by that idea because it was going to give me an opportunity to explore a lot of things that are important to me. and things that obsess me, frankly. >> rose: like? >> well, for example, i have just talked about the fact that i was in a very precarious situation. for a few year i was probably as poor as you can go without being homeless in the cut. u.k. which is not to say that friends and family didn't help me, because they did. but you know, it was tough. >> rose: and you were writing a book and had to depend on the government. >> well, yeah, i did. although i was working part-time at the-- the law was you could earn up to a very small amount a week without forefitting housing benefit which was the thing that was keeping us homed. so i worked up to that amount. i had a clerical job in a church at one point. so, and then i was teaching. but we were still existing partly on bene
PBS
Oct 13, 2012 12:00am PDT
noncommittal. i'll commit. >> i think it is tough for these sites, i have a couple friends that have local businesses in san francisco. and one of them has a tea shop and has gone on groupon several times, has done these great deals. he gets a lot of people that come in but oftentimes they come in just forth deal, they never return, they never tip the wait staff and it's just a bad experience. >> rose: it's one time. >> it's one time and somehow they have to figure out a way around that. >> rose: the idea was you will use that to get them to come back and they will become regular customers. >> it just doesn't happen often times. >> rose: people who use those are not looking to become regular. >> i guess it depends on the type of demographic. i have heard certain guilt type deal sites that have a slightly higher demographic that are better for these types of deals. so everyone-- they. >> take zenga as an example. >> rose: exactly. >> do what you have is sort of like a new version of a movie studio. a hits-based business. unless they can keep the hits coming and they did for a long time. and
PBS
Oct 4, 2012 3:00pm PDT
government especially state/local governments continue to... continue to cut jobs. and i think obama, he mentioned well let's hire more teachers and that, that would certainly alleviate it but, i think a lot of people don't expect government to necessarily solve the jobs problem but it would be nice if government wasn't the job's problem. >> reporter: well, i'm glad you brought that up because one subject that jim lehrer did introduce which is kind of tough to talk about in that forum, even here is the role of government. both men were talking in a very highly contentious way and also in some aspects agreeing about government having a role in the day to day lives of americans. did that help? did that clarify anything? >> for me, it helped soften romney. to hear it right from the horse's mouth that he does believe in the role of government helping in day to day maybe not to the extent of obama does was helpful. >> i think that, you know, if we look at government in the, in the eyes of history there have been very important roles that government has played in changing, that various things
PBS
Oct 24, 2012 3:00pm PDT
at local conditions. but flay broader sense, one of the things that concerns me is ultimately whether it's five, six, 10 years we'll get to the point where people believe housing prices will never go down again. housing can be a great investment. it can be a stable investment. it can also be a very risky investment. i think people need to go into this with their eyes clear, making sure what they're buying is really based on their needs and not the ability to flip it. >> brown: why don't you start, what do you wish you had heard in the debate? what do you wish you heard outo the campaign trail today? what do you want to hear? >> to tell you quite frankly, i was far more sympathetic to where governor romney started out, which is this is a process that needs to work its way out. the prices need to hit bottom. i think this is a problem of we built too much housing and the only way you work off excess supply, in my opinion, prices fall. and i appreciate and respect that he said that first. i think he is starting to recognize the politics of it after that. as an economist, they call economi
PBS
Oct 15, 2012 6:00pm PDT
supporters at a local pumpkin patch. among them sally russell who has voted for kennedy, president obama and brown. >> i work very hard on his first campaign. which surprised me. quite a bit. i thought he would do a good job. and the circumstances where senator kennedy had passed away. and i think he was... i'm not sure i was behind him as a person but as a senator i thought he was just outstanding. >> ifill: at town and country bowling lanes, diane travers, a democrat who supported brown two years ago said she's not so sure about him anymore >> i did vote for scott brown the last time because i felt very good vibes. i'm up and down. i have a feeling i'm going to go for elizabeth this time >> ifill: democrats outnumber republicans 3 to 1 in the deep blue bay state but republicans have won here statewide before including of course former governor romney but to win re-election scott brown is counting on the uncommitted voters that make up fully half of the electorate to be his fire wall. >> we need somebody who is going to be truly bipartisan >> ifill: brown describes himself at near
PBS
Oct 3, 2012 12:00am PDT
the west people are challenging us to withdraw from the world and just focus on our own local problems, i want to stay engaged in that and i work on some buying issues in the uk, unemployment with the youth is important and there is so much disaffection in politics i have launched this political organizing. > how is your brother do. >> he is doing great. >> why aren't you there now? >> because i think in my position i end up becoming a perpetual commentary where the media wants me commenting on him, and i was determined to go to the -- i have been for 25 years and made my contributions, but on his buying day i want it to be about him, not what i am saying so -- >> explain to me the relationship, the competition, i mean this is unusual. >> it is certainly unusual. he has done well as a politician in his own right, and our parents always encourage us to be engaged in public affairs or at least in taking responsibility, they said that if you can make a difference and you don't it is a waste, and that is a bad thing. >> did you let him know you would be competing? >> no. it is a c
PBS
Oct 10, 2012 12:00am PDT
about who is your competition? >> well, i would think in each city will have its local competition but if we talk of corporate and global competitors those companies that have the, call it the critical mass and the ability to market that, the ritz-carlton company. >> rose: sure, it is first one we think about. >> would certainly be more most formidable but there is a mandarin and the peninsula and the one and only and lot of independent, individuals hotel owners within each city. >> rose: do you still prefer big cities to resorts? >> no. we are going into a new country, we will want to establish first in the city before we will extend into a resort,. >> us to get a foothold, but, no, they are both viable, they are both part of the company's needs. we must have product of both in most major cities and most countries. >> rose: when you decided to give up the ceo job -- >> well, i -- you know, from day one i have always been in control of my destiny and. >> rose: i prefer that too. >> yes. and that's a privilege. but, you know, it is inevitable and i knew my major responsibility -- well l
PBS
Oct 3, 2012 3:00pm PDT
come here. i want to meet them. >> reporter: comfort has already won a seat on the local school board. he volunteered for then senator obama's campaign in 2008 but has since switched his allegiance to romney based on what he considers a broken promise by the president. >> i feel he's almost stiffed the voters on a couple of issues. the biggest one for me is education, obviously, because i'm on the school board, and i feel he's not paying near as much attention as he should to the educational system. >> what comfort cares about has >> reporter: what comfort cares about has instead been drowned out by the campaigns selling competing visions to iowans. the differing philosophies on job creation, the economy, and the role of government are clashing in newton, iowa. this is the birthplace of the washing machine, where maytag made its home for decades. in 2007, it became the town maytag left behind, when it closed its headquarters, moved operations to mexico. newton lost about 1,800 jobs and millions from its local economy. >> our main focus for newton right now is... is getting people back
PBS
Oct 5, 2012 3:00pm PDT
. >> they are working with state and local health departments to contact patients who may have received injections at the facilities who received the recalled lots of this medication to inform them that they may have been exposed, to find out out if they are having symptoms and instruct them to seek health care should they be ill. >> the >> sreenivasan: the tainted steroids came from a massachusetts pharmacy which has now suspended operations. in syria today, the rebel stronghold of homs endured the heaviest bombardment in months. thick plumes of smoke could be seen rising above the central city's skyline as syrian government warplanes, tanks and artillery intensified their assault. meanwhile, turkish media reported syrian troops fired another mortar round into southern turkey. no one was hurt, but the turkish military returned fire. a similar exchange earlier this week left several dead on both sides. the turmoil deepened today in south africa's mining industry. the world's largest platinum producer, amplats, fired 12,000 miners for staging an unlawful strike. it was the latest turn in
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